The Ikessar Falcon by K.S. Villoso

“Intricate, intimate, and very plotted.” – Nicholas Eames on The Wolf of Oren-yaroThe lovely sequel to The Wolf of Oren-yaro wherein the queen of a divided land struggles to unite her people. Even in the event that they despise her. K. S. Villoso is a “powerful new voice in fantasy.” (Kameron Hurley)The spiral to madness starts offevolved with a single push.Abandoned through her people, Queen Talyien’s quest takes a flip for the worst as she stumbles upon a plot deeper and greater sinister than she should have ever imagined, one with the intention to displace her king and see her son dead. The road domestic beckons, strewn with a tangled internet of deceit and not possible horrors that unearth the state’s real troubles – creatures from the dark, mad dragons, and guys with hearts hungry for power. To store her land, Talyien should confront the myth others have built around her: Warlord Yeshin’s daughter, image of peace, warrior and queen, and everything she ought to never be. The fee of failure is steep. Her buddies are few. And a nation carved by using a murderer can best be destined for war.The Chronicles of the Bitch QueenThe Wolf of Oren-yaroThe Ikessar Falcon

Description

Talyien, Queen of Jin-Sayeng, has been betrayed. She is in hiding, sheltered by using a slumlord in Anzhao City while she recovers from her confrontation with the sorcerer Prince Yuebek and a disastrous reunion with her estranged husband, Rayyel. Her very own guards have broadly speaking abandoned her, leaving her protected only via Nor, her defend captain; Agos, her early life friend; and Khine, a onetime health practitioner and con artist from the city’s seedy depths. And yet, it seems Talyien nevertheless has in addition to fall: Her erstwhile host turns her over to the city’s corrupt governor. Her escape, aided by using a shadowy faction from her home country, leads ever deeper into a morass of plots, secrets and magic that assessments the power of her friendships, distorts her overdue father’s legacy, and threatens the fabric of truth itself.

The Ikessar Falcon, K.S. Villoso’s sequel to The Wolf of Oren-Yaro, is fast-paced to say the least. It transitions from the darkish political myth of the first ebook to an apocalyptic epic harking back to Terry Brooks’ The Elfstones of Shannara at breakneck speed. There are nearly too many plot twists and new developments to track, which would be confounding were it not for the power of Villoso’s portrayal of Talyien. The queen is absolutely inside the identical boat as the reader as she struggles to keep up with the sheer pace at which her international is being turned inner out. Perhaps the most compelling subplot is Talyien coming to phrases with the character of leadership and what it way to rule. The Ikessar Falcon also includes some fascinating tendencies in Talyien’s relationships, especially those with Rayyel, Agos and Khine. Villoso’s clear expertise for characterization is as evident as ever.

However, the maximum striking differences between The Wolf of Oren-Yaro and The Ikessar Falcon are the fast expansion inside the placing and the abrupt shift within the role of magic. While the first book emphasized the political intrigue and cultural complexity of both Jin-Sayeng and Zirinar-Orxiaro, the second e-book recasts magic as the driving force behind all the machinations. In addition, at the same time as The Wolf of Oren-Yaro took place over some days and was set nearly entirely in the city confines of Anzhao City, The Ikessar Falcon compresses weeks of travel across oceans and continents into gaps between chapters. Although the characters are as compelling as ever, these shifts pass Villoso’s series towards the typical epic myth, and results in a miles broader writing fashion than the tightly constructed, putting-unique voice of the first book.

The Ikessar Falcon keeps the wonderful characterization and intrigue of The Wolf of Oren-Yaro while increasing both its global and the plot at a head-spinning rate. It does the whole thing the middle book of a trilogy must with an unusual diploma of authorial skill, and is a thoroughly entertaining examine in its own right.

Reviews

There are no reviews yet.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *